The Beginner’s Guide to Starting a Plant-Based Diet

One of the most powerful steps you can take to improve your health, boost energy levels, and prevent chronic diseases is to move to a plant-based diet. Science shows changing your nutrition is a powerful way to live longer, help the environment, and reduce your risk of getting sick.

You’re probably thinking that moving to a plant-based diet sounds like a great idea, but you don’t know where to start. Don’t worry, you’re in the right place – we’ve got the tools, insight, and expertise to make the change easy and enjoyable. We’ll answer your questions, provide helpful advice, and share the techniques you need.

How a Whole-Food, Plant-Based Diet Can Boost Your Health

There’s excellent scientific evidence that many chronic diseases can be controlled, reduced, or even reversed by moving to a whole-food, plant-based diet. Scientific research highlighted in the landmark book The China Study shows that a plant-based diet can reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes, heart disease, certain types of cancer, and other major illnesses. Many people also report bigger fitness payoffs, more energy, reduced inflammation, and better health outcomes after making the switch.

What is a Whole-Food, Plant-Based Diet?

It’s delicious! Before we get into what we mean by “whole-food, plant-based,” it’s important to dispel the myth that such a diet is hard work or boring. You might think that avoiding animal ingredients limits your options, but the reverse is true. You’ll become a more innovative cook, enjoying some of the best flavors you can imagine. You’ll try new ingredients and find a deeper appreciation of your food. It’s easy, too, especially with helpful tools like our meal planner.

Let’s get into the definitions:

Whole food describes natural foods that are not heavily processed. That means whole, unrefined, or minimally refined ingredients.

Plant-based means food that comes from plants and doesn’t contain animal ingredients such as meat, milk, eggs, or honey.

Your Whole-Food, Plant-Based Diet – The Foods You’ll Love

Here’s a quick overview of the major food categories you’ll enjoy on a plant-based diet, with examples:

Fruits: any type of fruit including apples, bananas, grapes, strawberries, citrus fruits, etc.

Vegetables: plenty of veggies including peppers, corn, avocados, lettuce, spinach, kale, peas, collards, etc.

Tubers: root vegetables like potatoes, carrots, parsnips, sweet potatoes, beets, etc.

Whole grains: grains, cereals, and other starches in their whole form, such as quinoa, brown rice, millet, whole wheat, oats, barley, etc. Even popcorn is a whole grain.

Legumes: beans of any kind, plus lentils, pulses, and similar ingredients.

There are plenty of other foods you can also enjoy – including nuts, seeds, tofu, tempeh, whole-grain flour and breads, and plant-based milks. However, we recommend eating these foods in moderation, because they are more calorie-dense and can contribute to weight gain.

The Benefits of a Whole-Food, Plant-Based Diet

There are several major benefits to moving to plant-based nutrition, all supported by excellent science. These benefits include:

Easy weight management: People who eat a plant-based diet tend to be leaner than those who don’t, and the diet makes it easy to lose weight and keep it off – without counting calories.

Disease prevention: Whole-food, plant-based eating can prevent, halt, or even reverse chronic diseases, including heart disease, type 2 diabetes.

A lighter environmental footprint: A plant-based diet places much less stress on the environment.

How do I know if a whole-food, plant-based diet is for me?

You don’t – until you try it! So many people who make the switch report feeling much better, having less fatigue, and losing weight, and otherwise enjoying a healthy lifestyle. We make the switch super easy with our extensive tools and resources.

Once you get started, it’ll be easier to keep going. As Dr. Craig McDougall says, “Once you have more energy, have lost some weight, or your stomach pain has disappeared, then it’s easier to continue eating healthfully. One of the best motivators for people transitioning to plant-based eating comes from how great they feel and how much more than can do in their lives once they’re feeling healthier.”

Can I eat a plant-based diet on a budget?

Whole-food, plant-based eating is cheaper than you think. Fresh produce goes a long way, and whole grains, potatoes, and beans are some of the most affordable bulk foods you can buy. Create meals around these staple items and you’ll definitely spend less than you do on a diet rich in meat and other animal products.

How can I eat whole-food, plant-based while traveling or away from home?

You will need to plan ahead a little, but it’s pretty easy to find whole-food, plant-based meals on the go. You can usually find fruit and dishes made with pasta, rice, and potatoes wherever you are. With a little creativity and flexibility, you can also prepare some fantastic food to take with you.

How do I eat out on a plant-based diet?

Most restaurants are very accommodating of dietary needs, and you should be able to review their menu online. Scan the menu in advance to see if a restaurant offers vegan options, and you’re already most of the way there. When you’re unsure, simply call ahead, explain your preferences, and they will probably be able to accommodate you.

How do I make sure I get the nutrients I need?

Whole plant foods contain all the essential nutrients (with the exception of vitamin B12) we need. You can get some B12 from fortified foods such as plant-based milks and breakfast cereals, but the best source is a simple B12 supplement. (In fact, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services recommends supplemental B12 for all adults over age 50 because as we age, many people lose the ability to absorb vitamin B12 from food sources.)

Is eating a whole-food, plant-based diet the same as being vegan?

While there are certainly some similarities between eating a whole-food, plant-based diet and being vegan, there are some differences as well.

Vegans avoid all animal products or exploitation in food, clothing, shoes, or any other aspect of their lives. Vegans do not necessarily focus on whole plant foods; they may eat refined and processed foods, although many choose not to.

By comparison, a whole-food, plant-based diet is defined as one that eliminates or minimizes all animal products and highly refined foods, including oil. That being said, TajQí teaches the gold standard plant-based diet, which is completely free of animal products and therefore vegan.

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